The 11 Most Expensive Lamborghini Cars in The World

In the realm of supercars, one name stands out like a beacon of luxury, speed, and unparalleled opulence—Lamborghini. Born from the genius mind of Ferruccio Lamborghini, this Italian brand has been setting the gold standard for high-performance vehicles since 1963. But have you ever wondered what it takes to own one of these mechanical marvels? Brace yourself, as we’re about to embark on a thrilling journey into the world of the most expensive cars ever created by Lamborghini.. This isn’t just about the price tag—it’s about the exclusivity, the heart-pounding performance, and the sheer artistry that goes into each model. So buckle up, as we count down from the ‘affordable’ to the ‘if you have to ask, you can’t afford it’, unveiling the jaw-dropping price tags of these automotive masterpieces.

The Most Expensive Lamborghini Cars

11. Lamborghini Miura SVJ – $900,000

Overview of the Miura SVJ

The Miura SVJ is a very rare and special version of the Lamborghini Miura, the first mid-engined supercar produced by the Italian automaker between 1966 and 1973. The SVJ stands for Super Veloce Jota, which means super fast in Italian and refers to the FIA’s Appendix J racing regulations. The Miura SVJ was created by Lamborghini’s test driver Bob Wallace, who wanted to make a more track-oriented version of the Miura SV, the ultimate road-going model of the Miura. Wallace modified the engine, suspension, brakes, chassis, bodywork, and interior of the Miura SV to make it lighter, more powerful and more aerodynamic. He also added a roll cage, racing seats, wider wheels, and a large rear wing. The result was a car that could reach 300 km/h (186 mph) and handle better than any other Miura.

However, Ferruccio Lamborghini, the founder of the company, was not interested in racing and did not approve Wallace’s project. He wanted to sell the car as a prototype, but Wallace managed to find a buyer who appreciated his work. The car became known as the Miura Jota and was later destroyed in an accident. Other Miura owners heard about the Jota and asked Lamborghini to convert their cars into SVJs. Only three cars were officially converted by the factory, while others were done by private workshops or dealers. The factory SVJs are considered the most authentic and valuable examples of the Miura, and are often referred to as the Holy Grail of Lamborghinis.

Key features and specifications

The Miura SVJ shared the same transverse mid-mounted 3.9-liter V12 engine as the Miura SV, but with some modifications to increase its output from 385 hp (287 kW) to 440 hp (328 kW). The engine had four camshafts, six Weber carburetors, dry sump lubrication and a ZF five-speed manual gearbox. The SVJ also had a limited-slip differential, which improved traction and stability.

The Miura SVJ had a steel monocoque chassis with aluminum body panels, designed by Marcello Gandini at Bertone. The body was slightly different from the regular Miura, with wider wheel arches, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing. The car also had pop-up headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights.

The Miura SVJ had a wheelbase of 2.5 meters (98.4 inches), a length of 4.36 meters (171.7 inches), a width of 1.76 meters (69.3 inches) and a height of 1.06 meters (41.5 inches). It weighed 1,292 kg (2,848 lb), which was about 100 kg (220 lb) less than the Miura SV.

The Miura SVJ had four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also had four-wheel disc brakes with ventilated rotors and twin calipers at the front. The car rode on magnesium alloy wheels with Pirelli Cinturato tires.

Reason for its high price

The Miura SVJ is one of the most expensive and sought-after Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, history and design. Only three factory SVJs were built: one for Paul Ferrandi of Paris and Corsica (chassis #5090), one for Hubert Hahne of Germany (chassis #4860) and one for Colonel Akle of Lebanon (chassis #4892). These cars have changed hands several times over the years, fetching millions of dollars at auctions or private sales. The most recent sale was in 2021, when chassis #5090 was offered by Kidston SA for an undisclosed price. The car was restored to its original red color and condition by ex-Lamborghini engineers in 2013.

Apart from the three factory SVJs, there are also some unofficial conversions or replicas that claim to be SVJs or have some SVJ features. These cars are not as authentic or valuable as the original ones, but they still command high prices due to their rarity and association with the legendary model.

The Miura SVJ is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents the pinnacle of Lamborghini’s heritage and innovation. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its beauty, power and exclusivity.

10. Lamborghini Diablo GT1 – $1 Million

Overview of the Diablo GT1

The Diablo GT1 is a racing car based on the Lamborghini Diablo, the second mid-engined supercar produced by the Italian automaker between 1990 and 2001. The Diablo GT1 was developed in 1996 by SAT, a French company specialized in prototypes and race cars, in collaboration with Lamborghini, who supplied a custom V12 engine and obtained the homologation for the GT championships. The Diablo GT1 was intended to compete in the GT1 class, which required a road-going version of the race car to be built. However, only two cars were ever made: one for JLOC, a Japanese racing team, and one for SAT, who kept it as a show car.

The Diablo GT1 was a radical transformation of the Diablo, with a completely new bodywork, chassis, suspension, brakes and interior. The car was lighter, more powerful and more aerodynamic than the regular Diablo, and featured a roll cage, racing seats, a large rear wing and a distinctive front spoiler. The car was capable of reaching 330 km/h (205 mph) and had a very aggressive appearance.

Key features and specifications

The Diablo GT1 used a modified version of the Lamborghini V12 engine, with a displacement of 6 liters and an output of 655 hp (488 kW) at 7,500 rpm and 506 lb-ft (686 Nm) of torque at 5,500 rpm. The engine had four camshafts, six Weber carburetors, dry sump lubrication and a ZF five-speed manual gearbox. The car was rear-wheel drive and had a limited-slip differential.

The Diablo GT1 had a steel monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by SAT. The body was much different from the original Diablo, with wider wheel arches, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing. The car also had pop-up headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights.

The Diablo GT1 had a wheelbase of 2.65 meters (104.3 inches), a length of 4.46 meters (175.6 inches), a width of 2.04 meters (80.3 inches) and a height of 1.11 meters (43.7 inches). It weighed 1,385 kg (3,053 lb), which was about 200 kg (440 lb) less than the Diablo.

The Diablo GT1 had four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also had four-wheel disc brakes with ventilated rotors and twin calipers at the front. The car rode on magnesium alloy wheels with Dunlop racing tires.

Reason for its high price

The Diablo GT1 is one of the most rare and expensive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its scarcity, performance, history and design. Only two cars were ever built: one for JLOC, who used it to compete in the Japanese GTC from 1997 to 2000, and one for SAT, who displayed it at their factory in France. These cars have never been sold to the public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $1 million.

The Diablo GT1 is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s ambition and innovation in motorsport. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

9. Mansory Carbonado Apertos – $1.6 Million

Overview of the Mansory Carbonado Apertos

The Mansory Carbonado Apertos is a limited edition convertible version of the Mansory Carbonado, a highly modified Lamborghini Aventador with a stealth-look carbon fiber body and a powerful twin-turbo V12 engine. The Carbonado Apertos was unveiled in 2014 and only three units were ever made. The name Apertos means “open” in Italian and refers to the removable roof of the car, which allows the driver to enjoy the open air and the sound of the engine.

The Carbonado Apertos is the result of Mansory’s extensive experience in customizing Lamborghinis, using high-quality materials, advanced technology and exquisite craftsmanship. The car combines refined elegance with sporty aggression, offering a unique driving experience for the discerning customer.

Key features and specifications

The Carbonado Apertos uses the same engine as the Carbonado, a 6.5-liter V12 that has been fitted with two Mansory turbochargers, increasing its output from 700 hp (515 kW) to 1250 hp (919 kW) and its torque from 690 Nm (509 lb-ft) to 900 Nm (664 lb-ft). The engine is mated to a seven-speed ISR transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.6 seconds and reach a top speed of over 380 km/h (236 mph).

The Carbonado Apertos has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Mansory. The body is much different from the original Aventador, with wider wheel arches, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights.

The Carbonado Apertos has a wheelbase of 2.7 meters (106.3 inches), a length of 4.8 meters (189 inches), a width of 2.1 meters (82.7 inches) and a height of 1.14 meters (44.9 inches). It weighs 1,575 kg (3,472 lb), which is about 50 kg (110 lb) less than the Aventador.

The Carbonado Apertos has four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with carbon fiber inlays and Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 255/30 ZR20 at the front and 355/25 ZR21 at the rear.

Reason for its high price

The Carbonado Apertos is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only three cars were ever built: one in black, one in white and one in yellow. These cars have never been sold to the public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $1.6 million.

The Carbonado Apertos is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Mansory’s vision and innovation in customizing Lamborghinis. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

8. Lamborghini Reventon – $1.6 Million

Overview of the Reventon

The Reventon is a limited edition supercar based on the Lamborghini Murcielago, the third mid-engined supercar produced by the Italian automaker between 2001 and 2010. The Reventon was unveiled in 2007 at the Frankfurt Motor Show and only 20 coupes and 15 roadsters were ever made. The name Reventon means “explosion” or “burst” in Spanish and refers to a famous fighting bull that killed a bullfighter in 1943.

The Reventon features a carbon-fiber exterior with a matte grey color and a design inspired by fighter jets. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior has three TFT liquid crystal displays with two different display modes, a g-force meter and seats made from black leather and brown Alcantara.

Key features and specifications

The Reventon uses the same engine as the Murcielago LP 640, a 6.5-liter V12 that produces 640 hp (477 kW) at 8,000 rpm and 660 Nm (487 lb-ft) of torque at 6,000 rpm. The engine is paired with a six-speed manual or e-gear automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.4 seconds and reach a top speed of 340 km/h (211 mph).

The Reventon has a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis with carbon-fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Murcielago, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Reventon has a wheelbase of 2.665 meters (104.9 inches), a length of 4.7 meters (185 inches), a width of 2.058 meters (81 inches) and a height of 1.135 meters (44.7 inches). It weighs 1,665 kg (3,671 lb) for the coupe and 1,690 kg (3,726 lb) for the roadster.

The Reventon has four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 245/35 ZR18 at the front and 335/30 ZR18 at the rear.

Reason for its high price

The Reventon is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only 20 coupes and 15 roadsters were ever built: one coupe was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world. These cars have rarely been seen in public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $1.6 million.

The Reventon is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s passion and innovation in creating supercars. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

7. Mansory Carbonado GT – $2 Million

Overview of the Mansory Carbonado GT

The Mansory Carbonado GT is a limited edition supercar based on the Lamborghini Aventador, the fourth mid-engined supercar produced by the Italian automaker since 2011. The Carbonado GT was unveiled in 2014 at the Geneva Motor Show and only six units were ever made. The name Carbonado means “carbon” in Spanish and refers to the carbon fiber body of the car, which has a stealth-look design inspired by fighter jets.

The Carbonado GT is the result of Mansory’s extensive experience in customizing Lamborghinis, using high-quality materials, advanced technology and exquisite craftsmanship. The car combines refined elegance with sporty aggression, offering a unique driving experience for the discerning customer.

Key features and specifications

The Carbonado GT uses a modified version of the Aventador’s 6.5-liter V12 engine, which has been fitted with two Mansory turbochargers, increasing its output from 700 hp (515 kW) to 1600 hp (1176 kW) and its torque from 690 Nm (509 lb-ft) to 1200 Nm (885 lb-ft). The engine is paired with a seven-speed ISR transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.1 seconds and reach a top speed of over 370 km/h (230 mph).

The Carbonado GT has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Mansory. The body is much different from the original Aventador, with wider wheel arches, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights.

The Carbonado GT has a wheelbase of 2.7 meters (106.3 inches), a length of 4.8 meters (189 inches), a width of 2.1 meters (82.7 inches) and a height of 1.14 meters (44.9 inches). It weighs 1,575 kg (3,472 lb), which is about 50 kg (110 lb) less than the Aventador³.

The Carbonado GT has four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with carbon fiber inlays and Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 255/30 ZR20 at the front and 355/25 ZR21 at the rear.

Reason for its high price

The Carbonado GT is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only six cars were ever built: one in black, one in white, one in yellow, one in green, one in blue and one in red. These cars have never been sold to the public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $2 million.

The Carbonado GT is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Mansory’s vision and innovation in customizing Lamborghinis. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

6. Lamborghini Reventon Roadster – $2.1 Million

Overview of the Reventon Roadster

The Reventon Roadster is a limited edition convertible version of the Reventon, a highly modified Lamborghini Murcielago with a stealth-look carbon fiber body and a powerful V12 engine. The Reventon Roadster was unveiled in 2009 at the Frankfurt Motor Show and only 15 units were ever made. The name Reventon means “explosion” or “burst” in Spanish and refers to a famous fighting bull that killed a bullfighter in 1943.

The Reventon Roadster features a carbon-fiber exterior with a matte grey color and a design inspired by fighter jets. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior has three TFT liquid crystal displays with two different display modes, a g-force meter and seats made from black leather and brown Alcantara.

Key features and specifications

The Reventon Roadster uses the same engine as the Reventon coupe, but with more power: a 6.5-liter V12 that produces 670 hp (493 kW) at 8,000 rpm and 660 Nm (487 lb-ft) of torque at 6,000 rpm. The engine is paired with a six-speed manual or e-gear automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.4 seconds and reach a top speed of 330 km/h (205 mph).

The Reventon Roadster has a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis with carbon-fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Murcielago, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Reventon Roadster has a wheelbase of 2.665 meters (104.9 inches), a length of 4.7 meters (185 inches), a width of 2.058 meters (81 inches) and a height of 1.135 meters (44.7 inches). It weighs 1,690 kg (3,726 lb), which is about 25 kg (55 lb) more than the coupe.

The Reventon Roadster has four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 245/35 ZR18 at the front and 335/30 ZR18 at the rear.

Reason for its high price

The Reventon Roadster is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only 15 cars were ever built: one was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world. These cars have rarely been seen in public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $2.1 million.

The Reventon Roadster is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s passion and innovation in creating supercars. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

5. Lamborghini Pregunta Concept – $2.1 Million

Overview of the Pregunta Concept

The Pregunta Concept is a one-off supercar concept car that was unveiled in 1998 at the Paris Motor Show and shown again in 1999 at the Geneva Motor Show. The car was based on the Lamborghini Diablo chassis and engine, but featured a completely new bodywork and interior designed by French company Heuliez. The car was painted in the same color as the Dassault Rafale fighter jet and had a futuristic design inspired by aviation and Formula One. Lamborghini never explained why they designed the car, but it was clear that it was not supposed to be their next flagship model.

The Pregunta Concept was an experimental project that showcased Lamborghini’s technical and stylistic capabilities, as well as their collaboration with other companies. The car was never intended for production or sale, but it attracted a lot of attention and admiration from the public and the media.

Key features and specifications

The Pregunta Concept used the same engine as the Diablo, a 5.7-liter V12 that delivered 530 hp (395 kW) at 7,100 rpm and 580 Nm (428 lb-ft) of torque at 5,200 rpm. The engine was paired with a five-speed manual transmission and a rear-wheel drive system. The car could accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.2 seconds and reach a top speed of 333 km/h (207 mph).

The Pregunta Concept had a steel tubular chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Heuliez. The body was much different from the original Diablo, with sleeker lines, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing. The car also had pop-up headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights.

The Pregunta Concept had a wheelbase of 2.65 meters (104.3 inches), a length of 4.4 meters (173.2 inches), a width of 2 meters (78.7 inches) and a height of 1.1 meters (43.3 inches). It weighed 1,450 kg (3,197 lb), which was about 200 kg (441 lb) less than the Diablo.

The Pregunta Concept had four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also had four-wheel disc brakes with ventilated rotors and twin calipers at the front and rear. The car rode on alloy wheels with Michelin Pilot SX tires in sizes 245/40 ZR18 at the front and 335/30 ZR18 at the rear.

The Pregunta Concept had a futuristic cockpit with three TFT liquid crystal displays that showed various information, such as speed, rpm, g-force meter, navigation system and rear-view cameras. The car also had racing seats made from black leather and blue Alcantara, as well as optical fiber lighting in the interior.

Reason for its high price

The Pregunta Concept is one of the most rare and expensive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its uniqueness, performance, design and quality. Only one car was ever built: it was initially owned by Lamborghini, then sold to Heuliez in 2000, then sold to Autodrome Paris in 2013. The car has never been sold to the public and its current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $2.1 million.

The Pregunta Concept is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s creativity and innovation in creating supercars. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

4. Lamborghini Sesto Elemento – $2.2 Million

Overview of the Sesto Elemento

The Sesto Elemento is a limited edition supercar that debuted at the 2010 Paris Motor Show. The car was produced by Lamborghini in collaboration with Boeing, using advanced carbon fiber technology to create a lightweight and powerful vehicle. The Sesto Elemento’s name means “sixth element” in Italian and refers to the atomic number of carbon, the main material used in its construction. Only 20 units were ever made, all for track use only.

The Sesto Elemento features a carbon fiber exterior with a matte black color and a design inspired by stealth aircraft. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior is minimalist and functional, with three TFT liquid crystal displays, a g-force meter and seats made from carbon fiber and foam.

Key features and specifications

The Sesto Elemento uses the same engine as the Lamborghini Gallardo LP 570-4 Superleggera, a 5.2-liter V10 that produces 570 hp (419 kW) at 8,000 rpm and 540 Nm (398 lb-ft) of torque at 6,500 rpm. The engine is paired with a six-speed e-gear automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.5 seconds and reach a top speed of over 350 km/h (217 mph).

The Sesto Elemento has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Gallardo, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Sesto Elemento has a wheelbase of 2.56 meters (100.8 inches), a length of 4.43 meters (174.4 inches), a width of 1.9 meters (74.8 inches) and a height of 1.18 meters (46.5 inches). It weighs 999 kg (2,202 lb), which is about 300 kg (661 lb) less than the Gallardo.

The Sesto Elemento has four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires in sizes 235/35 ZR19 at the front and 295/30 ZR19 at the rear.

Reason for its high price

The Sesto Elemento is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only 20 cars were ever built: one was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world¹. These cars have never been sold to the public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be over $2.2 million.

The Sesto Elemento is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s passion and innovation in creating supercars. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

3. Lamborghini Centenario – $2.2 Million

Lamborghini Centenario

Overview of the Centenario

The Centenario is a limited edition supercar that was unveiled in 2016 at the Geneva Motor Show. The car was produced by Lamborghini to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of its founder, Ferruccio Lamborghini. The Centenario is based on the Lamborghini Aventador, but features a new design and advanced technology. Only 40 units were ever made, 20 coupes and 20 roadsters, all sold to selected customers around the world.

The Centenario features a carbon fiber exterior with a glossy black color and a design inspired by Ferruccio Lamborghini’s vision and style. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior is luxurious and functional, with leather and Alcantara upholstery, a new infotainment system with a 10.1-inch touchscreen, and a g-force meter.

Key features and specifications

The Centenario uses the same engine as the Aventador SVJ, a 6.5-liter V12 that produces 770 hp (566 kW) at 8,500 rpm and 690 Nm (509 lb-ft) of torque at 5,500 rpm. The engine is paired with a seven-speed ISR automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.8 seconds and reach a top speed of over 350 km/h (217 mph).

The Centenario has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Aventador, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Centenario has a wheelbase of 2.7 meters (106.3 inches), a length of 4.92 meters (193.7 inches), a width of 2.06 meters (81.1 inches) and a height of 1.14 meters (44.9 inches). It weighs 1,520 kg (3,351 lb) for the coupe and 1,570 kg (3,461 lb) for the roadster.

The Centenario has four-wheel independent suspension with magneto-rheological dampers and pushrod springs. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 255/30 ZR20 at the front and 355/25 ZR21 at the rear.

The Centenario also has some innovative features, such as rear-wheel steering, which improves agility and stability at low and high speeds, and an active aerodynamic system, which adjusts the front splitter and rear wing according to the driving conditions.

Reason for its high price

The Centenario is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only 40 cars were ever built: one was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world for $2.2 million each. These cars have rarely been seen in public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be much higher than their original price.

The Centenario is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s tribute to its founder and its vision for the future. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

2. Lamborghini Veneno – $4.5 Million

Lamborghini Veneno

Overview of the Veneno

The Veneno is a limited edition supercar that was unveiled in 2013 at the Geneva Motor Show. The car was produced by Lamborghini to celebrate its 50th anniversary and to showcase its extreme performance and design capabilities. The Veneno is based on the Lamborghini Aventador, but features a new bodywork and engine tuning. Only five units were ever made, one for Lamborghini’s museum and four for selected customers, three coupes and one roadster, all sold for $4.5 million each.

The Veneno features a carbon fiber exterior with a metallic grey color and a design inspired by racing prototypes and fighter jets. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior is minimalist and functional, with carbon fiber and Alcantara upholstery, a new infotainment system with a 10.1-inch touchscreen, and a g-force meter.

Key features and specifications

The Veneno uses a modified version of the Aventador’s 6.5-liter V12 engine, which produces 750 hp (552 kW) at 8,400 rpm and 690 Nm (509 lb-ft) of torque at 5,500 rpm. The engine is paired with a seven-speed ISR automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.9 seconds for the coupe and 2.8 seconds for the roadster, and reach a top speed of 355 km/h (221 mph).

The Veneno has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Aventador, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Veneno has a wheelbase of 2.7 meters (106.3 inches), a length of 5.02 meters (197.6 inches), a width of 2.08 meters (81.9 inches) and a height of 1.17 meters (46 inches) for the coupe and 1.18 meters (46.5 inches) for the roadster. It weighs 1,450 kg (3,197 lb) for the coupe and 1,490 kg (3,285 lb) for the roadster.

The Veneno has four-wheel independent suspension with magneto-rheological dampers and pushrod springs. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 255/30 ZR20 at the front and 355/25 ZR21 at the rear.

The Veneno also has some innovative features, such as rear-wheel steering, which improves agility and stability at low and high speeds, and an active aerodynamic system, which adjusts the front splitter and rear wing according to the driving conditions.

Reason for its high price

The Veneno is one of the most expensive and exclusive Lamborghinis ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only five cars were ever built: one was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world for $4.5 million each. These cars have rarely been seen in public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be much higher than their original price.

The Veneno is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s tribute to its history and its vision for the future. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

1. Lamborghini Veneno Roadster – $8.3 Million

Lamborghini Veneno Roadster

Overview of the Veneno Roadster

The Veneno Roadster is a limited edition open-top version of the Veneno, a highly modified Lamborghini Aventador with a stealth-look carbon fiber body and a powerful V12 engine. The Veneno Roadster was unveiled in 2013 in Abu Dhabi and only nine units were ever made. The name Veneno means “poison” in Spanish and refers to a famous fighting bull that killed a bullfighter in 1914.

The Veneno Roadster features a carbon fiber exterior with a metallic grey color and a design inspired by racing prototypes and fighter jets. The car has no roof, only a strong rollover bar for safety. The car also has LED headlights, scissor doors and a distinctive eyelash-like trim around the headlights. The interior is minimalist and functional, with carbon fiber and Alcantara upholstery, a new infotainment system with a 10.1-inch touchscreen, and a g-force meter.

Key features and specifications

The Veneno Roadster uses the same engine as the Veneno coupe, but with more power: a 6.5-liter V12 that produces 750 hp (552 kW) at 8,400 rpm and 690 Nm (509 lb-ft) of torque at 5,500 rpm. The engine is paired with a seven-speed ISR automated manual transmission and an all-wheel drive system. The car can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.9 seconds and reach a top speed of 355 km/h (221 mph).

The Veneno Roadster has a carbon fiber monocoque chassis with carbon fiber body panels, designed by Filippo Perini. The body is much different from the original Aventador, with sharper edges, air intakes on the engine cover, a lower front spoiler and a large rear wing.

The Veneno Roadster has a wheelbase of 2.7 meters (106.3 inches), a length of 5.02 meters (197.6 inches), a width of 2.08 meters (81.9 inches) and a height of 1.18 meters (46.5 inches). It weighs 1,490 kg (3,285 lb).

The Veneno Roadster has four-wheel independent suspension with magneto-rheological dampers and pushrod springs. It also has four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers at the front and four-piston calipers at the rear. The car rides on forged light-alloy wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires in sizes 255/30 ZR20 at the front and 355/25 ZR21 at the rear.

The Veneno Roadster also has some innovative features, such as rear-wheel steering, which improves agility and stability at low and high speeds, and an active aerodynamic system, which adjusts the front splitter and rear wing according to the driving conditions.

Reason for its high price

The Veneno Roadster is one of the most expensive and exclusive cars ever made, due to its rarity, performance, design and quality. Only nine cars were ever built: one was kept by Lamborghini for its museum, while the rest were sold to selected customers around the world for $8.3 million each. These cars have rarely been seen in public and their current value is unknown, but it is estimated to be much higher than their original price.

The Veneno Roadster is a masterpiece of engineering and design that represents Lamborghini’s tribute to its history and its vision for the future. It is a car that appeals to collectors, enthusiasts and admirers alike, who appreciate its rarity, power and exclusivity.

FAQs

What is the 117 million dollar car?

Lamborghini Egoista

While no car has been officially sold for exactly $117 million, the Lamborghini Egoista comes close. This one-off concept car was unveiled in 2013 to celebrate Lamborghini’s 50th anniversary. Designed by Walter De Silva, the Egoista was inspired by the Apache helicopter and the concept of driving alone. It features a unique cockpit-like cabin that can be detached from the rest of the body in case of an emergency and a 5.2-liter V10 engine that produces 600 hp. In 2017, an anonymous buyer reportedly offered $117 million for the Egoista, but Lamborghini declined the offer, choosing to keep the car for its museum.

What is the rarest Lamborghini?

The Lamborghini Egoista is considered one of the rarest Lamborghinis. This is because it’s a one-off concept car, meaning only one unit was ever made. The Egoista was never intended for sale, and it currently resides in Lamborghini’s museum.

Which is the luxury Lamborghini?

All Lamborghini cars are considered luxury vehicles due to their high price, exclusive production numbers, and superior performance. However, some models stand out for their extreme opulence. The Lamborghini Veneno Roadster, for instance, is one of the most luxurious and expensive models, valued at around $8.3 million. It features a unique design, high-performance capabilities, and was produced in extremely limited quantities, making it a symbol of luxury and exclusivity.

the essence of luxury and exclusivity

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